Mlkman Cooking Show Episode 3 at Nutrition Republic Recipe

Mlkman Cooking Show Episode 3 at Nutrition Republic Recipe

Recipe The Japan Earth Bowl

Place the following ingredients in a high speed blender:

1 cup frozen organic banana

1/2 cup frozen organic mango

1/2 cut finely chopped organic kale

1/2 - 1 teaspoon organic matcha powder

5-6 organic mint leaves

1/2 cup organic coconut milk (can use rice milk as well)

Blend on low, ensuring to use the tamp, until all ingredients are well combined and scoopable.

In a bowl sprinkle some coconut chips and pepitas, then pour the mixture from the blender on top. Smooth the mixture in the bowl and top with more coconut chips, pepitas and a sprinkle of coconut sugar. Feel free to add any toppings you like though. Goji berries work a treat too!

Mlkman: celebrating one year of success!

Mlkman: celebrating one year of success!

Did you know it was our first birthday last month? Take a look back over the past year with us: we're proud of what we've achieved, and it's all thanks to you.

Interview: Orientai

Interview: Orientai

We had a chat with Kalyan, manager and business partner of Orientai Brighton, about the history of the Thai-style restaurant.

Interview: Pollen 185

Interview: Pollen 185

Jyoti, owner, manager and general all-rounder at Pollen 185 has done some fascinating things in her life. We caught up with her to find out how her love of food and travel led her to open up the homely cafe after years of working in Melbourne restaurants and nightclubs.

Interview: The Raglan Hotel

Interview: The Raglan Hotel

We had a chat with Daniel Brunoli, owner and general manager of one of the fresher faces on Adelaide's pub scene: The Raglan Hotel.

Interview: Yen Linh

Interview: Yen Linh

Find out more about the story behind Vietnamese eatery Yen Linh in this interview we had with the city store's manager, Yen.

Ninos Lamesita Cooking Show - 'Prawns Cooked in Coconut Milk' 'Ginataang Sugpo at Kalabasa'

Ninos Lamesita Cooking Show - 'Prawns Cooked in Coconut Milk' 'Ginataang Sugpo at Kalabasa'

Recipe: Prawns Cooked in Coconut Milk' 'Ginataang Sugpo at Kalabasa' 

Ingredients:

Coconut milk

Vinegar

White wine 

Fish sauce

Chilli

Spring onions (garnish) 

Pumpkin 

Garlic

Ginger 

Lemon grass

Prawns

Vegetable oil

Method: 

In a saucepan, sautee onions, ginger, garlic and lemon grass in vegetable oil. Add prawns and stir through. Add white vinegar and reduce.  

Add coconut milk and add diced pumpkin.  Simmer until cooked. You will know when the prawns are cooked when they change colour.  

Arrange prawns in pumpkin shell and pour sauce on top to serve. 

Finish with spring onions. 

Hello Sarnie delivering lunches in Adelaide

Hello Sarnie delivering lunches in Adelaide

Feeling a bit peckish at the office but don’t have time to head to a café with colleagues for your lunch hour? Don’t stress, Hello Sarnie has got you sorted and now that we’ve teamed up with them over here at Mlkman, delicious and nutritious office lunches have never been easier.

Offering handmade prepackaged breakfast and lunch options that are made fresh daily, in their own on-site kitchen. Hello Sarnie boasts a huge range of healthy salads, soups, sandwiches, baguettes, and sweet treats to have alongside a coffee. We caught up with co-owner Andrew Pearce to talk sarnies and find out more about the idea behind the business.

 

Who is behind Hello Sarnie?

Myself [Andrew Pearce] and Mike Kendall-Smith.

What inspired you to open the café?

Myself and Mike are both from the UK, where handmade pre-packaged food is all the rage, we wanted to bring a piece of home to our new Australian home. The ‘lightbulb’ moment came about two-and- a-half years ago, when both Mike and I worked in the city, I called him up one to catch up for lunch.

We really fancied a decent sort of grab-and- go prepackaged sandwich, which wasn’t going to cost the earth. An experience we had both grown up with from a similar sort of business in the UK. There’s literally nowhere to go to get a decent (as we call it) sarnie. This got the cogs moving slowly and over a beer we started talking over it in a bit more detail. We started to conduct in-depth research to find if there was a niche in the market.

As the research and development started to snowball we released that there was a hole in the market for a brand to offer convenient, healthy, freshly made daily, on- the-go food to Australia. On-the- go means giving time back to the consumer, they do not have to queue for long or wait for it to be made, we come in early to ensure that all our products are ready to ‘grab and go’ by 11am and with a price-point to match.

We wanted to create a business that has habitual visitors, to create a regular/loyal customer base was the key for us. To take the burden out of making lunches, we want our customers to have the mind set of…“What am I gonna take in for lunch  today, what should I do? I might just get in the office and go to Sarnie for lunch ‘cause it’s not gonna break the bank and I know it’s made fresh daily and with good nutritional ingredients.”

You will not find any additives or preservatives in our food, everything is made using fresh ingredients daily…from our mayonnaise, to our dips, to our soups, salads and sandwiches. Whatever we don’t sell at the end of each day, we donate to charity at night. Cos fresh is best!

You’re so right though, Adelaide is mostly based around café culture. There’s lot of options for nice healthy meals, but it’s a bit harder when you want to get something quick.

Yeah, like you said there’s plenty of knife and fork options, that’s what Mike and I call it between ourselves.

We believe we have created a brand that is… Quick and convenient now meets nutritious and delicious

Whereabouts in the UK are you from?

London.

I was just thinking, the concept reminds me of Pret A Manger.

That’s exactly the concept. Mike and I have never claimed that fact that we created or stared healthy pre-packaged breakfast and lunch options. Hello Sarnie is our take on it. We both grew up in and I went to uni in London and Pret was a definite frequent lunchtime and breakfast-time visit of myself and Mike.

In 2011 my wife and I went back to the UK and again in 2014, and when Mike returned back from a visit back home that’s what inspired the conversation to create Hello Sarnie. My Wife has also experience Pret from her own travels and was well behind Hello Sarnie, she saw that there was a hole in the market to be filled with something similar.

Have you had much experience in hospitality before?

Yes, pretty much all my previous experience is within hospitality. My first job was as a dishy at the local hotel. So I worked there throughout my high school and college years and uni days and when I came to Australia my first job was at the Adelaide Casino. Then my next job was at Cocolat, the chocolate café on Rundle Street. That’s where I met Mike. I worked my way up from a customer service individual on the shop floor to the supervisor of that store, and as the company grew up I took on the role of marketing manager for them. And after that I had a quick stint over in the UK, and when I came back I was working for national franchise Wok In A Box as their national market manager. So I’ve always been around food retail in some points.

You have quite a high rotation of meal options – do you have much say in the menu or does a chef take care of that?

We do have a fully qualified chef in the kitchen. From a menu standpoint obviously myself, Mike and Ben, our chef, have a discussion around what’s on trend, what’s in season and that’s really the foundations of selecting menu choices from a sarnie to soups or salad. And then obviously the process of how easy it is to collate, obviously there’s no point in putting caviar in a sandwich and trying to charge $300 for it – it’s not gonna fit with our brand and the demographic we’re trying to target.

From a menu rotation standpoint, the soups change weekly. We’ve just introduced a winter menu so that’s pretty much a whole overhaul of the menu, a few subtle changes to the top sellers, like I said seasonal produce, but then at the same time we try and keep innovative and change things over every two weeks. So maybe there might be a sweet option one week and then a new sarnie or baguette or wrap might come on. Obviously like I said, you’ve got habitual visitors creating the business because of brand loyalty, but also to keep that loyalty you need to be innovative at the same time.

Do you have desserts too?

Starting today we have a new product on the shelf, the rocky road brownie. Especially in the colder months we’ve come to realize that the sweet tooth of the individual comes out, it definitely does in myself! Having that option as well for people to have a sarnie and something sweet for afterwards, is good. I mean it’s no secret that we have a lot of bread options and these products do tend to lead towards a sweeter finish whether that is a rocky road brownie or a chocolate hazelnut mousse pot. They’re the sweet side of things but we do a black rice and a mango passion puree pot and a carrot and walnut loaf so there are healthier spins on other sweet treats.

Do you cater towards vegetarians, vegans and celiacs?

Absolutely. We do find vegan – harder to cater for – not only do we have to be more careful from a production side in the kitchen, but also be more mindful when selection produce. We do and have catered for vegan customers and we do our absolute best to cater for any dietary requirement. Our chef is actually celiac himself so we see that as a positive from a business standpoint because he’s very mindful of wheat and gluten in products. Again, in innovation and menu selection, that’s another thing that plays on our mind – it’s where we can get the supply chain from to guarantee it’s gluten-free. But gluten-free and vegetarian options are definitely aday-to- day product at Sarnie and vegan options will definitely increase as we find our feet – I mean, we’re only nine months old – so we understand there’s a market for it but we’d rather be not the jack of all trades and the master of none so we focus on each part at a time. Ben our chef and Mike, who run the kitchen and take control of the food behind the business see that there’s definitely a hole in our business from a vegan [perspective] and maybe more gluten-free products.

Melt Pizzeria

Melt Pizzeria

Melt Hyde Park opened in August 2005 with Melt CBD opening in December 2013. The name came from its sister restaurant next door, The Melting Pot, as well as invoking the idea of melting ingredients on their pizzas. The Melt team comprises Simon Kardachi, Justin Brooks, Scott Kuerschner and Sally Davey, who collectively have a wealth of hospitality know-how and experience behind them.

Kardachi is highly regarded in Adelaide as the owner of several respected food and beverage establishments including Press Food & Wine, Osteria Oggi, Bread & Bone Wood Grill, Maybe Mae, The Pot Food & Wine, and Proof Laneway Rooms.

Executive chef Scott Kuerschner has previously worked at Mezes, Pheasant Farm, Eros, Universal Wine Bar, Amalfi, and The Pot Food & Wine, making it obvious that visitors to Melt are in very capable hands. We caught up with Sally for a quick chat about the history of the restaurant.

Who are the people behind Melt?

I’m one of the business partners here in the city, but there are four of us in total. So there’s Simon Kardachi, Justin Brooks, and Scott Kuerschner, who are the original owners of Hyde Park Melt Pizzeria including myself in the city.

What was the inspiration in opening the restaurant?

Hyde Park was quite a while ago now – eight years ago, it was set up. Just with the intention of providing a casual eatery with food being cooked well, tapas and pizza with a Spanish and Italian influence.

So where did the name come from?

Melt came from the original restaurant next door, which was Simon Kardachi’s restaurant Melting Pot, so they decided to call it Melt. And also we’ve got cheese and all those sorts of things it invokes.

Have you all had a basis in hospitality work before?

We have. I myself have been in the industry for about fifteen years, and the others have twenty years on them.

What makes Melt different to other restaurants?

Our pizzas are all on a thin base. We keep the flavours fairly simple and good, and try and put together delicious unique pizzas – it’s pretty interesting for all of our customers.

If it was my first time visiting Melt, what would you recommend I try?

Green beans with garlic and chilli are probably my favourite in the tapas, and the hommus and ground lamb is a good one as well. The scallop pizza is probably my favourite.

Do you have many vegetarian and gluten-free options as well?

We do. We’ve got gluten-free options which we offer as an extra, and we’ve got about four different vegetarian pizza options as well. We cater for vegans as well, so the chefs put together a vegan pizza. It’s not listed on our menu, but we tell the vegans to leave it in our hands and we’ll put together something for them.

Sukhumvit Soi 38 Pad Thai Receipe

Sukhumvit Soi 38 Pad Thai Receipe

Sukhumvit Soi 38 Pad Thai (Chicken)                                                             

Serves: 2

Ingredients          

500g Thinly Sliced Free Range Chicken Breast                          

150g Dry Rice Stick Noodles                          

1 Free Range Egg                          

50g Bean Sprouts                          

5 stems Garlic Chives    

½ Thinly Sliced Red Onion         

1 TBS White sugar                          

2 TBS Thai Fish Sauce                          

1 TBS Oyster Sauce                          

3 TBS Tamarind Paste                                                

2 TBS Vegetable OIl                          

2 TSP Crushed roasted peanuts                          

2 TSP Dried chilli flakes                          

1 Small Lemon or Lime                                 

Method

Soak noodles in cold water until softened (about ½ an hour), drain and set aside.

In a Wok, heat up oil and throw in sliced chicken breast and quickly stir until beginning to turn golden. Next, stir in the sliced red onion, followed by the drained noodles. Add about 50 mls of water and toss in a wok to coat noodles in oil and combine chicken and onion. 

Stir in Tamarind paste until noodles are coated, followed by the sugar, oyster and fish sauce. Toss noodles until sugar dissolved and sauces combined. Add half of the beansprouts and all of the garlic chives and stir through until soft.

Serve with fresh bean sprouts, peanuts, chilli flakes and a wedge of lemon

Anthony & Cascada Café

Anthony & Cascada Café

Anthony from the newly-established Cascada Café is passionate about bringing customers a variety of menu options, specializing in everything from vegan and vegetarian meals to meat-based mains. We caught up for a chat to learn more about Cascada’s unique take on modern fusion cuisine.

Who are the people behind the restaurant?

Pretty much the way it came about was that I’d been working in the family business for a long time, like my entire life, and what happened was about a year and a half ago now, one of our agents told us that the place was up for grabs and I just spoke to my parents and they thought it would be a good opportunity for me to take that one more for myself and put my own spin on it instead of just working for them and their businesses.

So I went down there and really liked the place, it had a good local feel, so I decided to do it and I researched the menu that I wanted to do. I did get a lot of help from my parents, they are still involved but I’ve got more of my spin on it. So my dad’s really good with design work so he pretty much came up with the design of the inside, while I worked with the menu and how I wanted it to operate. That’s really how it came about. It was really us two that started it off.

What kind of businesses have your parents worked in?

It’s always been hospitality but it’s been more like traditional-style stuff, so more like big late-night trading cafes and pizza, pasta, schnitzel menus. So I guess Cascada’s a lot different, there’s a lot more of a modern menu. We do the vegan stuff and a different range of mains, it’s [got] more of a healthy kind of undertone to it.

We’ve been going for about seven months – a lot of people still don’t know where we are, it’s the kind of spot where you have to know where you’re going. You don’t really randomly stumble across it.

So it’s kind of modern Italian cuisine, is that right?

Yeah, I mean, it is Italian in a sense. I think I’m a bit touchy with that. We do the wood-oven pizzas, which I guess people associate with being Italian, so we do have Italian but we also do a range of vegan dishes. We also do the pork belly and other stuff like that. I guess Italian’s an easy way of summarizing it, but I guess in some sense we’re also partly vegan or vegetarian. My origins are Italian so that has a bit of an effect on the menu, but we’ve also got a modern fusion with it.

Have you always dreamt of opening a restaurant?

Yeah, it’s something being in that industry and growing up in it, you kind of of get a taste for it. Some people like it, some people don’t. I’ve always enjoyed working with other people, I like dealing with customers. You meet a lot of good people. And I always thought it’d be something that I want to do. I’ve always enjoyed the idea of doing it because you get a lot of self-determination, you kind of dictate your own hours and if you want to work really hard and put in, you can do that. It gives you that opportunity.

What was the fitout process like?

It did take a long time. We got in there and we put up the ‘coming soon’ sign but it took like, eight months probably. We did it real slowly and we were pretty meticulous with it – we didn’t want to rush into anything. The actual process itself wasn’t too bad because we used exposed bricks and wood – they’re pretty natural resources so with the exposed brick we kind of ripped back the gyprock in front of it.

We didn’t do too much structurally, it was just time-consuming trying to find the right tone and colour and what goes where, and where to put the counters and how you want it to work.

Why did you name the restaurant Cascada?

We were looking for a name that suited the place. We were trying to look at names to do with the area, and its location to Waterfall Gully. I guess that’s kind of central to the business really, like a local café situated near Waterfall Gully, we get a lot of people from there. So Cascada is a translation for waterfall. In Italian or in Spanish they refer to a waterfall as ‘cascada’, or ‘la cascada’, so that’s where we got the name from.

Why is your restaurant unique to others in the area?

We’ve got a strong push on [vegan/vegetarian menu items]. It’s a growing market and we know that a lot of people are conscious of that, and I guess when families go out and say if one person is vegan, you want to be able to cater to that. We want to have a restaurant to cater to someone that’s vegan, vegetarian, [as well as] someone that wants to go have a nice pork belly. We kind of have tried to make it so that our restaurant is suited to all tastes and at the same time, we haven’t tried to throw a blanket over it – we’ve tried to put in good, unique meals that we think people would enjoy at the same time.

A lot of the vegan places, they’re like the new kind of craze – those specialty cafes coming out – but they don’t really trade at night. Trying to get good vegan dishes at night isn’t that easy to locate. So the vegan menu has been really good so far.

What are some dishes you’re proud of on the menu?

The pizzas have been really well-received. The Cascada pizza, which is our gourmet meat one, has been really popular. That’s a nice one. On the mains, the pork belly is really nice. And then with the vegan dishes; the vegan pastas we do have been really popular. We use shredded zucchini as pasta and we do a lentil and olive spaghetti, and a mushroom scallopini. They’ve been really popular and you don’t have to be vegan to enjoy them, I think anyone can enjoy those dishes.

The way we’ve done our menu, we want to make sure we’re there to cater to all kinds. We’re pretty confident that most families, that anyone can come in and we can look after them and there’s something that they’ll enjoy. We’ve tried to make sure we’ve got good, friendly young staff and I think they’re a good bunch!